Tag Archives: SDYC

SAN DIEGO’s Mark Reynolds ON 2019 FINALIST LIST AS Olympic Hall of Fame INDUCTEE

There are 15 finalists for the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame class of 2019, but only one San Diegian. Tabitha Lipkin caught up with a sailor on that list that has traveled the world, but holds the 92106 area code close to his heart.

San Diego native nominated for Olympic Hall of Fame

There are 15 finalists for the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame class of 2019, but only one San Diegian. Tabitha Lipkin caught up with a sailor on that list that has traveled the world, but holds the 92106 area code close to his heart.

Posted by Tabitha Lipkin on Wednesday, August 21, 2019

List of Olympic Finalists and Bios

Mark Reynolds

OLYMPIC GAMES
1988 – Sailing
Silver: Star
1992 – Sailing
Gold: Star
1996 – Sailing
8th: Star
2000 – Sailing
Gold: Star

TOP 5 ATHLETIC ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  1. After winning the gold in 2000, Reynolds was named World Sailing’s and U.S. Sailing’s Yachtsman of the Year. These awards are considered the highest honor in the sport of sailing globally and in the United States, respectively.
  2. Won a gold medal at the 1979 Pan American Games.
  3. Reynolds was a two-time world champion in 2000 and 1995. He has eight world championship medals in the Star class.
  4. Reynolds is a 10-time continental champion.
  5. In 1989 and 1992, he was named Athlete of the Year for Sailing by the USOC.

TOP 3 REASONS FOR CONSIDERATION

  1. Reynolds is the most decorated Olympic sailors in U.S. history. In three of the four Games he attended, he earned a medal (two gold, one silver). In 1996 (Reynold’s worst Games performance) he still placed in the top 10.
  2. Off the water, Reynolds is extremely motivated and an incredible team player. While he was training for the Olympics, he simultaneously worked as a sailmaker. He not only designed the sails for all three of his medal-winning boats, but also those for his competitors.
  3. Reynolds’ dedication to fostering U.S. Olympic sailing transcends dedication to his own campaigns. In 2008, 2012 and 2016, Reynolds served as a coach for the U.S. Olympic Sailing Team. In 2016, even after the Star class was eliminated from the Olympic Games, Reynolds shared his expertise by coaching the U.S. Men’s Laser sailor, Charlie Buckingham. With guidance from Reynolds, Buckingham finished his first Olympic Games’ in the boat widely renowned as the most competitive Olympic class in 11th place.
Image: “Hal and Mark” – Painting by Jim Dewitt

BACKGROUND
• Competed in Star at four Olympic Games (1988-2000), three of them alongside Hal Haenel (1988-96).
• Four-time Olympian and three-time medalist, including two golds.
• Won six world championship medals in Star, including golds in 1995 and 2000.
• He also won a Star gold medal at the 1986 Goodwill Games, and a silver medal in the Snipe class at the 1979 Pan American Games.
• He learned to sail from his father, James Reynolds, who was a 1971 world champion in Star, as crew for Dennis Conner.
• Attended San Diego State University, graduating in 1979.
• Was named the 2000 ISAF/Sperry World Sailor of the Year, and in 2002, he was inducted into the World Sailing Hall of Fame.

KEY TAKEAWAY
Mark Reynolds represents the qualities of a model Olympian. He is an avid supporter of U.S. Sailing and Olympic excellence, an extremely talented athlete, and is dedicated to fostering the next generation of champions. During Reynold’s tenure dominating the Star class, he displayed a vast depth of skill and sportsmanship.

Defending Champion Tops Leaderboard at the 2019 Junior Match Racing Championships Despite Forfeiting 2 Races

LONG BEACH, Calif., June 1, 2019 – David Wood, the 2018 Champion of Long Beach Yacht Club’s annual Junior Match Racing Invitational tops the leaderboard of this year’s event, despite forfeiting two matches so as not to miss Prom.

Photo Credit: Laurie Morrison

The event is a two-day, Grade 4, six-team, match racing event sailed in modified Solings on Alamitos Bay.

Before leaving the dock, the 18-year-old Wood, representing Balboa Yacht Club, said that consistency was the goal of the day. By the time he left the course after five races, the 51st World Sailing-rated sailor was the only unbeaten skipper. His early departure left the other five competitors hopeful of gaining some ground, but only fellow BYC skipper Jeffrey Petersen came close.

Photo Credit: Laurie Morrison

Petersen, who bested Wood in March’s Butler Cup, lost the head-to-head match in the day’s first race, giving Wood the tiebreaking edge. At the end of the day, half way through the second round-robin of the competition, Wood topped the leaderboard with five wins and two losses, followed by Petersen also at 5-2.

The LBYC teams, in a freeway-series type of matchup against the nearby BYC teams, had a day that matched the winds; shifty and inconsistent.

Although each of the skippers won at least two races, the day was an example of how important experience is. Wood has sailed 20 graded events since 2016 and Petersen 11 since mid-2017. Both of them have sailed in international events, traveling as far as Australia to race.

Most of the matches were won or lost in the five-minute pre-starts, when the sailors are jockeying for position to cross the start line first or be on a favored side of the start line, potentially making maneuvers that result in their competitors drawing a penalty.

Photo Credit: Laurie Morrison

It’s all about good boat handling; being in the right place at the right time and being able to anticipate or control an opponent, race officials said. It’s boat handling first, then learning to thinking strategically about what you’re doing with the boat.

Principle Race Officer Alexis Hall said this event was developed specifically so that junior sailors could get a jump start into match racing. The event is considered an excellent opportunity for match racers to polish their skills leading to the Rose Cup. Less experienced match racers have an opportunity to get a better grasp of the sport, during daily debriefings with coaches and umpires. However, Saturday’s debriefing was moved to just ahead of Sunday’s skipper’s meeting to allow other participants to attend proms and juggle school activities.

Hall, a second-year Fashion Institute student has served as PRO for eight events and was just named LBYC’s Rookie PRO of the year.

Sunday’s racing will complete the second round robin matches, then the Semi Final, Petit Final and Final race.

LBYC Solings

The boats racing in today’s event, are believed to be the largest yacht-club owned fleet of Solings in the country. They were built between 1961 and 1967, bought in pairs as of 2009, later modified by and maintained by LBYC. The modifications were to simplify the boats so they could be used for learning, rather than being the Olympic sailing machines they were initially designed for. The boats are 26.75’ LOA with 6.25’ beam.

Results after Day One

Correction: William Mueller is representing ABYC

2019 Bacardi Cup Results

Miami, FL / March 3 – 9, 2019

SoCal sailors Eric Doyle and Payson Infelise (SDYC) win the Star Class in a fleet of 64.

Bruce Ayres and Team Monsoon (Mike Buckley, George Pete, Jeff Reynolds and Chelsea Simms) from Newport Beach (NHYC) takes third in the Melges 24 Class.

COMPLETE RESULTS

Eric and Payson

2018 SDYC Hot Rum II

November 17, 2018

Race 2 Results

 

2018 SDYC LIPTON CUP

EVENT WEBSITE

RESULTS

Day 1 R3 has begun.Update: ‪R3 finished with Southwestern Yacht Club in 1st, Newport Harbor Yacht Club in 2nd and San Diego Yacht Club in 3rd. ‬

Posted by Lipton Cup on Friday, October 26, 2018