Tag Archives: ABYC is the Place to Be

Long Beach’s Jay Golison takes Day One lead at the Viper 640 Worlds

Long Beach, CA – August 20, 2019

Local Skipper Jay Golison, along with Steve Flam and Eric Doyle had a good day day today to take a 4 point lead after three races.

Results After 3 Races

2018 ABYC Memorial Day Regatta

RESULTS

SCYA E.E. Manning Series / Shadden #4 Race Results

RESULTS

 

2017 29er Worlds Friday Recap

Wind and Expectations Mount, as “Make-it or Break-it Day” 
Looms At Zhik 29er Worlds

LONG BEACH, Calif., August 4, 2017 – Bolstered by better breeze, with steady winds of 12 to 16 knots, the team of Benji Daniel, 16, and Alex Burger, 21, RSA, widened their lead to place a firm grip on first place in the 29er World Championship regatta.

RESULTS

One-hundred-twenty-nine teams from around the globe are competing in the six-day event, hosted by Alamitos Bay Yacht Club, which concludes tomorrow, August 5.

Daniel and Burger said they came to the championship regatta with the goal of simply doing their best. But after another solid day of racing – consistently placing in the top five throughout the finals – it just occurred to them that they could win this thing.

Despite sailing the 29er together for only four months, the young men trained specifically for this competition, purposely sailing in mixed conditions. Training in the waters off both Durban and Cape Town, the boys’ hometowns, respectively, has prepared them well. Despite the series starting with unusual conditions for Long Beach, Burger reports that sailing conditions in South Africa are even more variable.

They also attributed their success to their height. It’s a massive advantage, they said. Both young men are tall and lean, giving them more leverage. “We also complement each other as a team, not only physically in size, but in making smart decisions,” said Burger.

Daniel, at the helm, is responsible for making sure the boat is going top speed all the time. “Whoever sails the shortest distance at the highest velocity, wins,” Burger said, adding with a smile, “speed makes you look clever.”

Daniel directs them along shortest route but credit he said goes to both team members for sharing responsibilities half and half on the boat – tactics and implementation.
Despite doing really well, the pair say that goal has not changed: do their best. “Our attitude will be the same ‘til the last race,” Burger said.

Although they started the day with a 1-2-1, Duncan Loiaz/Elias Dalli, ARG, made a valiant effort of reclaiming first place, but a 12th place finish in the last race left them in second, with the two French teams hot on their derrières. Seb Lardies/Scott McKenzie, NZL, dropped from a tie for third, to fifth. The top US team of Toppa/Rosenberg slid to 12th.

Next Gen Takes the Helm

For nearly two decades, the 29er has been a popular junior class; considered a stepping stone to higher level racing, and a favored platform for the progeny of sailing greats, cutting their teeth. The 29er Worlds fleet at ABYC is no exception, sprinkled with promising sailing stock: like Harry and Harriet.

Harry Melges’ great-grandfather started the Melges Boat empire, which continued to grow with the successes of Harry’s grandfather Buddy, and Dad. “I’ve been around sailing my whole life, going to every regatta,” says Melges, 16, who grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisc., and is racing with Finn Rowe. Despite family fame, Melges says there’s, “no pressure. I’m doing this for myself.” Fairly new to the 29er, finishing 21st in the Gold fleet today, he said, “This is the most competitive event I’ve sailed in yet. And the venue is awesome.”

Reared with another yachting legacy, Harriet “Hattie” Rogers last name is synonymous with yacht design; from the Contessa line created by her grandfather, to round-the-world racers designed by her father Simon.

“I’ve been sailing since I was an infant: I didn’t have much of a choice! But I loved it from day one,” said Rogers, 17. As for her father, she continued, “He’s been out a lot this week, watching. On the water I see him more as a coach and team manager. He’s got so much experience, and is such a good sailor, I learn a lot from him. I kind of soak it all up.”

“It’s been a really good regatta,” added Rogers, who is racing with Emily Covell, daughter of Olympic medalist Mark Covell; but with a nod to regular crew and training partner Eve Townsend. “The quality of the fleet here is really high – I just made it into the Gold fleet,” she admitted, finishing 49th in Qualifying. They finished in 47th place at the penultimate day of Finals. “And the race committee has done a good job getting races in, in tricky conditions, and I’d like to say thank you to them.”

All That Glitters is Not Gold

At the top of the Silver Fleet, Morgan Pinckney /Michael Sabourin of Newport Beach, Calif. are in tight clash with the Kiwis.

“There are some really good sailors in the Silver Fleet,” Pinckney stressed, attributing that to several teams who got Black Flag Disqualified in the Qualifying Series, bumping them down the ranks. “It’s really close, and the starts are really gnarly. You’ve got a boat five feet above you, a boat five feet below you, and you’ve just got to find a hole. Everyone has good speed; it’s all about having good tactics.” They sit two points behind Craig Keenan/Reece Caulfield, in second; with Ben Peterson/Sean Paterson in the lead at 93 points.

In the Bronze Fleet, Brazilians Lorenzo Bernd/Philipp Rump are poised in first, with three bullets under their belt in Finals, so far.

It’s not just about race results, noted New Zealand Coach Matt Thomas. “Our focus is to help the racers set goals, follow the process and learn to solve problems independently, without coaches or anyone else.” Despite some good-spirited ribbing from competitors stopping by the coach boat, Thomas maintains that it’s all about learning, “They are all kids, at the end of the day.” But at the same time, the teams are still keen to do well and win.

Racing continues Saturday August 5, commencing around noon until roughly 3:30PM. Three races are expected tomorrow, with favorable conditions forecast. A prize-giving, ceremony and celebration will follow at host ABYC.

Alamitos Bay Yacht Club

ABYC was founded in the mid-1920s, and expanded in the years following WWII. In 1968, the Club was the first US recipient of the St. Petersburg Yacht Club Trophy: an award presented by US Sailing for excellence in race organization and management. ABYC was recognized again in 1981 and 2016 and maintains a world-wide reputation as a premier small boat club dedicated to the development of the sport of sailing. ABYC is located at 7201 E Ocean Blvd, Long Beach.

Zhik, the title sponsor of the event, is an Australian sailing apparel manufacturer known for innovative gear for all aspects of sailing, combining design and style with technical proficiency and style.

Cover Photo Credit: Matias  Capizzano

2017 29er World Championships – Thursday Update

LONG BEACH, Calif., August 3, 2017 – Despite a half-hour dock hold, before the boats launched this morning, the wind kicked in on this first day of Final Series races, and the competitors dug in, setting the tone for world-class sailing at Zhik 29er World Championship Regatta.

RESULTS

The first weather mark saw a parade of athletes proficient in knowledge of their boats and their ability to get the most of out of them. Hard tacks were made with precise steering, and well-executed maneuvers cleanly launched a colorful array of spinnakers.  This was the Gold Fleet; they deserved to be here and just demonstrated why.

Although international competitors continued to dominate the top 10, thanks to the return of typical Long Beach wind and consistently good races, the US team of Alie Toppa and Jacob Rosenberg leapt into a three-way tie for third place with an 8-7-1 record for the day.

Last week, the team placed second at the US National Championship where unseasonable weather reigned. “No more funky conditions,” Toppa said, thankfully. Rosenberg, 19, who started sailing at host venue Alamitos Bay Yacht Club, said thanks to “classic” Long Beach conditions, racing today was just simpler.

“We could just concentrate on speed; where to go, where to tack and jibe,” said the Stanford student. The pair have been sailing the 29er together for less than two years. They chose the 29er for its exciting, youthful and speedy appeal. Toppa previous sailed 420’s. The 29ers are faster, but a lot of hard work, she said.

The College of Charleston student and sailing team member, also 19, is from Ft. Lauderdale. Between clinics, practicing and the championship regattas, she’s been here most of the summer. The game plan for winning is to stay focused, take it one race at a time; stick to the daily and tune-up routines, the pair said.

Finishing with a 3-2-4, Benji Daniel/Alex Burger, RSA, are sticking with their winning game plan and letting it be known that they did not come from halfway around the world not to give it their best. Benjamin Jaffrezic and Leo Chauvel, FRA, moved up four places to move into second place. Duncan Loiaz/Elias Dalli, ARG, lost their grip on first place and slipped to sixth thanks to an atypical 24th in the second race. Theo Revil/Gautier Guevel, FRA, dropped into the tie with Toppa/Roseberg and Seb Lardies/Scott McKenzie’s, NZL.

The US team of Neil Marcellini/Ian Brill, who edged in at fourth in the Qualifying Series, tumbled slightly to 13, while the 2016 US National Champions David Eastwood and Samuel Merson rose a couple rungs higher.

Vying for the top female team, Annabelle Davies/Madison Woodward, AUS, dropped several spots to18th while the team of Tania Bonilla/Nuria Miro, ESP, remain close, in 21st place.

Scores from the Qualifying Series have been wiped, but competitors started the Finals Series today with their rank in place; carried over as standings in Race 1. These standings however, cannot be discarded as the series progresses.

The top 50 finishers qualified for Gold fleet, with the next 40 in Silver, and the balance in Bronze. The Finals Series continues August 4 and 5. One hundred and twenty nine teams from 17 nations are participating in the World Championship event hosted by ABYC. Racing continues on the waters off Alamitos Bay daily at noon. Prize giving and closing ceremony is slated for Saturday evening on the grounds of ABYC.

Making Adjustments
Principal Race Officer (PRO) Mark Townsend reported that the building wind resulted in seeing racers who had excelled in lighter air fall back, and those more experienced in breezier conditions cross the finish line faster. Race 1 started with a casual 7-9 knots, building to 12-14 for the second, and 16 for the third with gusts to 20.

According to Torontonian William Bonin, who sails with his brother Sam, CAN, dealing with the choppy water has been a challenge. The great number of boats and ocean conditions has created more chop than they are used to. To compensate, they’ve been working on sailing the bow down lower than usual. Toronto Harbor can be breezy, but they rarely get waves.

“It’s challenging, not having sailed in these types of conditions,” Bonin said. “But experience also makes a big difference; having a lot of regattas under your belt.” That experience helped them into the Gold Fleet. Despite the sea state, their emphasis is their start. “It’s so hard to come back if you’re rolled off the line. Boats in front have better wind,” he said, and a better chance at the podium.

Looking Ahead
Youth sailing, experiencing a world championship regatta like this, and racing the 29er is the path to becoming an Olympian, said Malcolm Page. The Australian Olympic and multiple-time world sailing champion stopped by the regatta Wednesdayand Thursday evenings to spend time talking to some of the competitors. This generation of sailors is probably aiming for 2028, the first real chance for most of them, he said.

“There is something about this sport, the freedom of it, the ability to choose where you go, how to get there, that is really special and can be enjoyed for a lifetime,” said Page. “Embracing the amazing feeling you get from sailing and just having fun is the best way to have your dreams become reality.”

Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
ABYC was founded in the mid-1920s, and expanded in the years following WWII. In 1968, the Club was the first US recipient of the St. Petersburg Yacht Club Trophy: an award presented by US Sailing for excellence in race organization and management. ABYC was recognized again in 1981 and 2016 and maintains a world-wide reputation as a premier small boat club dedicated to the development of the sport of sailing. ABYC is located at 7201 E Ocean Blvd, Long Beach.

Zhik, the title sponsor of the event, is an Australian sailing apparel manufacturer known for innovative gear for all aspects of sailing, combining design and style with technical proficiency and style.

* Results pending protests. For further details and complete results please visit www.29erworlds.org.

2017 29er Worlds Qualifiers Final Recap

LONG BEACH, Calif., August 2, 2017 – Day Three of the Zhik 29er World Championship regatta got underway late today: as the Alpha Course fleet struggled in capricious breeze to complete Race Six which was abandoned late Tuesday.

Race Results

The delay was an added challenge on an already tricky, tight day. Light and unstable wind conditions continued to plague the event, but the Qualifying Series wrapped up with a total of nine races.

The fickle breeze did not stop Annabelle Davies/Madison Woodward, AUS, from getting their first bullet and finishing the Qualifiers as the top female team; with Tania Bonilla/Nuria Miro, ESP, second.

A lively international field continued to dominate the fleet, with Duncan Loiaz/Elias Dalli, ARG, maintaining a grip on first place, holding off a challenge by Theo Revil/Gautier Guevel, FRA, and Benji Daniel/Alex Burger, RSA, close astern. Francesco Kayrouz/Jackson Keon, NZL, finished fifth.

If there had been any expectation the US teams would have a huge local knowledge advantage, that was shot down by abnormal weather conditions, brought on by storms off Mexico. Neil Marcellini/Ian Brill, USA, edged in at fourth in the Qualifying Series, with Nicolas Martin/Damian Saponara, ninth.

The top 50 teams will advance to compete in the Gold fleet of the Finals August 3 through 5. The second 40 teams will move to Silver, and the balance to Bronze.

One hundred and twenty nine teams from 17 nations are participating in the six-day World Championship event hosted by Alamitos Bay Yacht Club. Competitors’ average age is estimated to be 16; with a few barely in their teens, like Ireland’s wee Lola Kohl (racing with Johnny Durcan).

But one couple touts a combined age of 75. Jaclyn Manrique and Patrick Szeto, of California’s Sequoia Yacht Club, have a lot less experience than their younger rivals, but plenty of gumption. They’ve been sailing the 29er just a few months, and finished the Qualifying Series at the bottom of the leaderboard.

“Dead last,” Szeto joked, but with a smile. Their goal was to learn, and they have: logging their best finish of the series – 51 – Wednesday. It didn’t get them into the Gold fleet, but they did meet many helpful racers, coaches and parents, they said, on their 29er quest.

It Takes a Village 
Regatta Chair Ed Spotskey said the seeds were planted three years ago, to host the 29er Worlds at ABYC, saying the club’s stature and PRO Mark Townsend’s reputation is why they were chosen. “But the nitty-gritty work kicked in around March,” Spotskey explained. While ABYC has a total membership of 400, over 150 signed up to volunteer. “That’s a solid 50-percent of our active members,” he pointed out. “All excited to be a part of it.”

And they were put to the task, as 260 sailors, 47 coaches, parents, supporters, race committee staff and more – plus containers of boats and equipment – began arriving at the bayfront facility. “Racing didn’t start until July 25, but teams and their equipment started arriving July 5! We weren’t staffed for that, that early; but everyone stepped up. The volunteers came forward, it was very rewarding.”

Spotskey said his team also learned a lot by running the 29er Nationals the week prior. “What we thought was going to happen, and what really happened, were two different things. Anything that wasn’t working, we fixed. It was a great learning process and everybody, regardless of whether they were Race Committee, ABYC staff, Food and Beverage, or what – everyone was glad we had that event first, so we could be properly prepared for the Worlds. There’s a lot of great teamwork taking place out there on the water, but I’m proud of the teamwork that’s taking place here too.”

Clear Skies Ahead
“Classic Long Beach conditions” are expected to return for the balance of the week, bolstering competition in the Finals. Clear, blue skies are forecast to bring steadier, stronger wind, as inland sun and temperatures stimulate the sea breeze.

With improved conditions, and a clean slate – scoring is scratched and competitors start anew –the 29er World Championship Title is still up for grabs.

Racing continues on the waters off Alamitos Bay, beginning at noon daily. Prize giving and closing ceremony is slated for Saturday evening, on the grounds of ABYC.

Alamitos Bay Yacht Club
ABYC was founded in the mid-1920s, and expanded in the years following WWII. In 1968, the Club was the first US recipient of the St. Petersburg Yacht Club Trophy: an award presented by US Sailing for excellence in race organization and management. ABYC was recognized again in 1981 and 2016 and maintains a world-wide reputation as a premier small boat club dedicated to the development of the sport of sailing. ABYC is located at 7201 E Ocean Blvd, Long Beach.

Zhik, the title sponsor of the event, is an Australian sailing apparel manufacturer known for innovative gear for all aspects of sailing, combining design and style with technical proficiency and style.

*Results pending protests. For further details and complete results please visit www.29erworlds.org.

SPORTY DAYS & SPICY NIGHTS PREVAIL AT ULLMAN SAILS LONG BEACH RACE WEEK

JUNE 25, 2017  LONG BEACH, CA – – Sporty sailing conditions by day, spiced rum and dancing by night: Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week delivered 24/7, for the hundreds of sailors who turned up to race in the waters off Long Beach, Calif. this weekend.

RESULTS

 

“Alamitos Bay Yacht Club and Long Beach Yacht Club team up to put together this event each year, merging our forces and using our years of experience and knowledge from this event, and others, to provide the best regatta possible for our participants,” said co-chair John Busch, of LBYC. “This year we were blessed with strong winds, fair seas, excellent competition and great parties. And we couldn’t do it without sponsors like Ullman Sails and all the others who support this great event.”

Photo Credit: Cynthia Sinclair

Three stellar days of breeze and sunshine rounded out this annual funfest of racing and parties. Over 100 teams, hailing from Montana to Mexico, competed in one design and PHRF racing, on both windward-leeward and random leg courses along the Southern California coast.

“We were a little worried initially, when we didn’t see the number of entries we’d like early on,” Busch admitted, “but as usual, people wait to sign up.” Traditionally, numbers are lighter in Transpac years, as those racers are tied up with final preparations for the Los Angeles to Honolulu Race which starts next week.

“But we ended up with 122 boats, and some really strong fleets, like the J/70s, Viper640s, and Pac52s; plus the weekend warriors who come out to play and make it such a fun event,” said Busch.

Photo Credit: Cynthia Sinclair

There were thrills and spills, in today’s 15 to 20 knot breeze and chop. Despite the sporty conditions, the Pac52 BadPak made a comeback, nudging Invisible Hand out of the lead by one point. Temptress triumphed in the lively Farr 40 competition, while Caper won solidly in the J/120 fleet.

Chris Snow’s Cool Story Bro iced the 26-boat J/70 fleet, never finishing lower than fifth place; Pat Toole’s 3 Big Dogs topped the Corinthian entries. Code Blue blew away the Schock 35 division, with top three finishes in all seven races, to earn the Pacific Coast Championship title.

Rival won PHRF C; E Ticket aced PHRF B; and Kuai took the Sportboat division; while Boomslang prevailed in the Viper640 Class, and earned One-Design Boat of the Week honors.

Busch added, “Our Random Leg classes have continued to increase in size over the years; we are seeing more competitors who like to do distance races, in addition to windward-leeward. We see it as the best of both worlds.”

In those categories, Dream Catcher got three bullets in RL-C, while DistraXion also took three firsts, in RL-B. Peligroso took RL-A1, and Elyxir held off Stray Dog to triumph in RL-A2, winning PHRF Boat of the Week. Elyxir, sailed by Skip and Stacy Ely, along with daughter Amy Ely and crew, also won the Golison and Kent Family Trophy for the highest placing boat with a minimum of three family members aboard.

In the battle for the Catalina 37 National Championship title, Newport Harbor Yacht Club’s Team Ayres/Satariano ousted four-time winner DH3, who took second; while Jane’s Addiction took third. But Dave Hood’s DH3, Bruce Cooper’s J/70 entry USA-32, and the Farr 40 Temptress teamed up to defend LBYC’s title in the annual Yacht Club Challenge.

“Ullman Sails is excited to sponsor this event once again, and to support great sailing, competition, and camaraderie at this fantastic venue. We appreciate the host clubs, all the volunteers, and of course the racers who continue to show up each year,” said Ken Cooper, of Ullman Sails.

“TOP SHELF RACING” LURES SAILORS FAR AND WIDE TO ULLMAN SAILS LONG BEACH RACE WEEK JUNE 23-25

EARLY ENTRY DEADLINE IS TODAY, JUNE 5th.

JUNE 1, 2017 LONG BEACH, CA – – The early bird discount isn’t the only reason Corinthian Yacht Club’s Gardyloo Traveling Road Show Team was the first to register for Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week, June 23, 24 and 25, 2017.

“The racing is top shelf, the competition is really good, and the parties – oh the parties! – are excellent,” says skipper Eric Nelson, who will return with his Tacoma, Wash. team for the sixth year.

Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week has been a perennial favorite of west coast sailors since the 1980s. It features one-design and PHRF racing on windward-leeward or random leg courses, on the exhilarating waters of Long Beach, Calif.

Classic fleets, like the Schock 35s, will use the event to crown their Pacific Coast Champion; while J/70, J/105, J/109, and J/120s boost their standings in the Southern California High Point Series. Other classes include the Farr 40s, Viper 640s and the exciting new Pac52 fleet.

The highly competitive Catalina 37 fleet will battle for the National Championship title. Nelson and crew hope to better their top finish – fourth place in 2015 – and stand on the podium this year. He credited the Long Beach Sailing Foundation with, “keeping the boats in good shape and making it so easy for those of us from out of town to come to the regatta, essentially hop on the boats, and go race.”

Plus, he added, “It’s Southern California, in June … After this winter and spring in Tacoma, where we have seen over 45 inches of rain in the last six months, wouldn’t you want to go to the sun?!”

Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week enjoys reliable prevailing westerly breezes that spur on the racers during the day. Parties at hosts Alamitos Bay Yacht Club, and Long Beach Yacht Club, spur them on at night. Roughly 1,000 sailors on 150 boats are expected to compete in this action-packed event.

Early entry deadline June 5!

Enter on or before June 5, 2017 and get a handy discount on fees – which incorporate race entry and slip or dry storage, plus complimentary hors d’oeuvres each night; ABYC After Race Dance Party Friday; LBYC After Race Mt Gay Rum Party Saturday; and Sunday Trophy Presentation Party at LBYC –

with free water taxi service between the clubs each evening.

Close of entries is Tuesday June 20, 2017 at 1800PST – so act now! Visit www.lbrw.org for full race details and to register online.

 

Schedule of events

Thurs. June 22

12:00 pm: Registration Opens at LBYC
6:00 pm: Registration Closes at LBYC

Friday June 23, 2017

8:00 am: Free Gourmet Coffee Bar at LBYC
8:00 am: No host breakfast at LBYC & ABYC
10:00 am: Registration Closes at LBYC
10:30 am: Competitors Briefing at LBYC
1:00 pm: Races start
5:00 pm – 9:00 pm: Water Taxi Service
5:00 pm – 9:00 pm: Party at ABYC

Saturday June 24, 2017

8:00 am: Free Gourmet Coffee Bar at LBYC
8:00 am: No host breakfast at LBYC & ABYC
12:00 pm: Races start

4:30 pm – 9:00 pm: Water Taxi Service
5:00 pm – 7:00 pm: Cash bar opens at ABYC
5:00 pm – 9:00 pm: Mt Gay Rum Party at LBYC

Sunday June 25, 2017

8:00 am: Free Gourmet Coffee Bar at LBYC
8:00 am: No host breakfast at LBYC & ABYC
12:00 pm: Races Start
3:00 pm – 5:00 pm: Cash bar at ABYC
3:00 pm – 7:30 pm: Cash bar at LBYC
4:00 pm – 7:30 pm: Water Taxi Service
4:00 pm: Food, drinks, cash bar at LBYC
5:00 pm: Trophy Presentation at LBYC