73rd Newport to Ensenada International Yacht Race Open for Entry

Newport Beach, CA – The Notice of Race and Registration page for entry are now available for the 73rd edition of the 2020 Newport to Ensenada International Yacht Race. These can be found on the event’s new website at www.nosa.org, with the start date scheduled for Friday, April 24, 2020.

First raced in 1948 with entries that included Hollywood stars like Humphrey Bogart, Spencer Tracy and Errol Flynn, this classic ocean race is held annually and organized by the Newport Ocean Sailing Association (NOSA). The event is unique among international distance races in being open to entry for a large and diverse group of sailors and boat types, and annually attracts hundreds of boats and thousands of participants in both the race itself and the popular pre- and post-race social events in Newport Beach and Ensenada, Mexico.

This success is in part because the Newport to Ensenada Race has actually been organized into three races in one event, each with its own merits but starting at the same time off Newport’s Balboa Pier:

(1) The main Newport to Ensenada Race (N2E) is a 125-mile offshore overnight race intended for all boats over 21 feet in length. Scoring will be using PHRF or ORR ratings for monohulls and ORCA ratings for Multihulls. An Unlimited Class is also available for very fast boats interested in elapsed time scores only. PHRF classes will be divided into ULDB and non-ULDB entries depending on their PHRF Performance Factor. There is also a CRUZ class option to enter, where PHRF and ORCA CRUZ entries may use their engines at night for a time penalty calculated from their engine log. PHRF CRUZ entries may also enter in Spinnaker or non-Spinnaker divisions.

(2) The Newport to San Diego Race (N2SD) is a 60-mile race intended for those teams in boats over 21 feet in length interested in a coastal offshore experience without the length of the race to Mexico. Eligibility and scoring options are the same as the main N2E race, except no ORR class is offered.

(3) The Newport Sprint to Dana Point Race (N2DP) is a 14-mile race intended for entry-level and small-boat sailors racing monohull one-designs or boats with PHRF or Portsmouth handicaps, or multihulls racing with ORCA handicaps. High Performance one-designs over 13 feet in length may also race subject to approval from NOSA.

Each race will offer take-home awards in a variety of criteria. So-called Primary Awards will be given for rankings determined by corrected time results in each class. Secondary Awards will be given to top places in other award categories, such as All-Female or Doublehanded Crew in PHRF, ORR and ORCA scoring. Each race’s Notice of Race details Award guidelines.

There are also numerous prestigious Perpetual Trophies awarded in a variety of categories…the list of winners on these trophies are a chronicle of the great sailing yachts raced in Southern California (and beyond) throughout the post-War period. For example, last year’s winner of the NOSA Trophy for fastest elapsed time was the reigning Sydney-Hobart Race champion Alive, Phil Turner and Duncan Hine’s Reichel/Pugh 66, who also won the Amigo Trophy for being a first-time winning N2E entry and the Lahaina Yacht Club Trophy for having the fastest PHRF class elapsed time.
Finally, an added feature of these races and included in the entry fees is the ability for friends and family who cannot race to follow along using the YB satellite tracking system, where positions, speeds, ETA’s and even projected results are all available online for free and easy access. This valuable tool also provides links to each entry’s social media access links during the race.

“This offshore race is a Southern California classic in every sense of the term,” says Bill Gibbs, Commodore of NOSA. “Not only are we rooted in the history of sailing in this region, but we continue to innovate and adapt to the changing dimensions of the sport to maximize participation…and fun. The race does more than any other on the US West Coast to get boats and sailors out to enjoy the Pacific, whether racing to win or just having a good time with friends.

“Whether you’re sailing a 29er to Dana Point, a Sportboat to San Diego, a Volvo 70 to set a race record or the family cruiser to Ensenada, we welcome all to join us next year in April for Southern California’s largest and most fun ocean racing event.”

More info found on the event website at www.nosa.org.

The Newport Ocean Sailing Association (NOSA) was formed in 1948 as an organization that promotes yacht racing in Southern California. Besides organizing the annual Newport to Ensenada, the Newport to San Diego and the Newport to Dana Point Races, NOSA provides financial assistance to junior sailing programs and other non-profit organizations that encourage and develop amateur watersports with an emphasis on sailing, boating and seamanship. NOSA is thankful for the support of the 2020 N2E from the following Bridge Sponsors: City of Newport Beach; and the following Flag Sponsors: GrinGo, Heineken USA, Novamar Insurance Group, SatellitePhoneStore and Ullman Sails Newport Beach.

CHRISTOPHER WEIS WINS CALIFORNIA DREAMIN’ SERIES

Shane Young, Returning 2017 Champion, Wins Series Final Regatta

Long Beach, Calif., Nov. 3, 2019 —Returning California Dreamin’ Series winner Shane Young had trouble getting his motor running – his Catalina 37 being towed to the racecourse by the mark-set boat, but once out there, he and his LBYC crew won six out of seven matches to finish the two-day regatta with a 12 – 2 record.

Both losses were to yesterday’s leader Greg Dair; the final match coming down to a couple of feet lost while recovering from a penalty turn. The win earned Young, the 2017 Series Champion, 100 points toward his 2019 series total, but it was not enough to top Del Rey Yacht Club’s rising star, Christopher Weis.

The 23-year old won the San Diego leg of the series last month in a J22, earning him 100 points and putting him in a series tie with Nicole Breault of St. Francis Yacht Club.

But Weis and crew found their stride today, improving over yesterday’s 4 wins and 3 loss record and won six of the day’s seven matches. The only loss was to Young. Rounding after rounding, the team worked together like a well-oiled machine; winning the series and moving up this regatta’s leaderboard to take second-place.

“It was really a group effort,” said Weis. “All the matches were really competitive, and it was great to sail against such accomplishes sailors.” Matches against Breault, the series highest-ranked World Sailing competitor (61) was particularly close, and hard-fought, he said changing leads up to four times.

He and his crew Roberto Stevens, Dylan Finestone, Haydon Stapleton, Willie McBride and his brother Nicolas Weis, grew up sailing together. All of them are individually, really good sailors, he said. Last year Weis, Stevens, Finestone and junior match racing teammates Alex Burrow and Sidney Gathrid were awarded the Association of Santa Monica Bay Yacht Clubs Competitive Yachting Achievement award.

Next year, Weis, the regatta’s second-highest-rated competitor, at 83 with a bullet, will lead his crew at Ficker Cup here at LBYC. Chris Macy, LBYC’s Chairman of the 2020 Ficker Cup presented Weis with his invitation to the coveted event.

“We are really excited for Ficker and to be working our way up the ladder,” said Weis. To do well in April, the plan is to start training on some bigger, heavier boats. The crew normally sails in boats less then 25’feet. The Catalina 37’s, Weis said, are like having another 25-feet of boat length upfront and double the weight.

The annual California Dreamin’ Series is comprised of three regattas. St. Francis Yacht Club hosted the first regatta in March. This weekend’s racing, aboard Long Beach Sailing Foundation’s Catalina 37s, was a World Sailing, Grade 3 Match Racing event.

Competitors earned points for racing in each of the three events according to how they finished. In the overall standings, Breault finished in second place and Liz Hjorth of California Yacht Club finished third.

This weekend, 50 percent of the eight competing skippers were women.

As the winner of LBYC’s two-day regatta, Young was awarded the Barney Flam Perpetual Trophy, which he said was an honor, particularly because it is in celebration of one of crewmate’s Steve Flam’s father.

“Pulling the crew together, many of whom are college friends was like getting the band back together. So, winning here is particularly rewarding, said, Young. Next year, Young hopes that he and the crew can coordinate schedules to do more racing but to also represent the club well.

Accepting the award, Young thanked Randy Beers, the regatta’s principal race officer, the race committee, that included Commodore Camille Daniels, for doing such a commendable job orchestrating 14 races in light wind; adding that the umpires, who made a lot of good calls, as also appreciated for volunteering their time

Young’s crew were Flam, Mark Ryan, Erik Berkins, Nicolas Santos and Jack Jorgensen.

Greg Dair, representing Cabrillo Beach Yacht Club, finished the weekend’s regatta in third place.

“I was lucky enough to get the best group of sailors together for this event, and we hope to do more in the future,” Dair said at the trophy ceremony. Earlier in the day, he said the day’s goal was to do well and learn more as a team. In August, Dair, along with Kevin McCarthy and Zak Merton placing fourth for Alamitos Bay Yacht Club at the Viper 640 Worlds. Despite yesterday’s leaderboard-topping day, Dair said the Catalina 37s were a little harder to get used to than he figured, and the boat did not always end up where he expected.

The wind off Belmont Veteran’s Memorial Pier did not always show up where it was expected either. Racing started in light winds at five to seven knots of shifty breeze that brought in two rolling banks of fog and had the race committee resetting marks nearly a dozen times throughout the day.

OVERALL RESULTS

California Dreamin’ in Long Beach – Day 1

Dair & Young Debut in 1st and 2nd
The 3-regatta series concludes today November 3rd

Long Beach, Calif., Nov. 2, 2019 —California Dreamin’; indeed! Greg Dair, a former Alamitos Bay Yacht Club coach, competing in his first California Dreamin’ Series event, won six of the day’s seven matches to debut in first place. Long Beach Yacht Club’s Shane Young, the 2017 series champion returned in a big way, also making his 2019 series debut with a 6-1 record. But the loss to Dair dropped him to second via the tie-breaker.

Greg Dair and crew made their California Dreamin’ Series debut today in first place.
Photos by Jeff Demain at www.demainphotography.com

The LBYC event is the last of three regattas that comprise the California Dreamin’ Series. The first event was hosted by St. Francis Yacht Club in March. San Diego Yacht Club hosted the second regatta in October. Both of those events were sailed in J22’s. Today’s racing, aboard Long Beach Sailing Foundation’s Catalina 37s, is a World Sailing, Grade 3 event.

Nicole Breault, of StFYC and Christopher Weis, of Del Rey Yacht Club, went into today’s races tied for first place in the Series, both with 100 points. Breault, the series highest-ranked World Sailing competitor (61) won the first event with an all-female crew, while Weis won the second regatta. Today was the first time the two have sailed against each other. Weis, the second highest-rated competitor, at 83rd, took the match.

Competitors earn points at each of the three events based on how they finish. Liz Hjorth, who started the day overall in third place and Marilyn Cassedy are the only two competitors who will have sailed in all three regattas. The overall series winner will be announced at the end of racing tomorrow, along with recognition for the winner of this weekend’s racing.

Breault, said she’s sailed the Catalina 37s annually since 2012, and that each time there is a reacquaintance period involved. But thanks to the practice time yesterday, she’s confident it will not take her core Bella Racing Team crew and three men – honorary Bellas – long to get back up to speed with the boat. “The boats are a handful,” she said, “But I’ve got a really good group here and they work well together. The goal is to get stronger and stronger each race.”

The highly ranked Alexis Gesualdo, (93) also made her series debut; and like Dair and Young, started at the bottom of the series leaderboard with zero points. Representing North Port Yacht Club of Long Island, New York, Gesualdo, and her crew flew in late last night. This morning, she met up with her secret weapon – Scotty Dickson – who will be sailing with her this weekend. Dickson famously led his LBYC crew to second place in this year’s Congressional Cup. This summer he has been coaching Gesualdo and has been a “massive source of information and growth,” she said.

Also on the water tomorrow is Dave Hood, LBYC’s celebrated Staff Commodore. Hood won this leg of the event last year and went on the finish second this year at Butler Cup and the third at Ficker Cup. Both those events are held here and raced in the storied Catalina 37’s. Tomorrow, Hood will be on the water not as a competitor, but as an umpire.

Head Umpire Randy Smith explained that top match racers make excellent umpires, and that umpiring makes competitors better match racers. “It really opens your eyes, provides a 180-degree angle on aspects of racing that you thought you knew,” Smith said.

Racing started late today thanks to a no-wind delay. Light, atypical conditions persisted throughout the day, with boats returning to the docks shortly before dark.

Tomorrow’s first race is scheduled to start at noon off the Belmont Veteran’s Memorial Pier.

Day 1 Results
1 Greg Dair
2 Shane Young
3 Bruce Stone
4 Christopher Weis
5 Nicole Breault
6 Liz Hjorth
7 Alexis Gesualdo
8 Marilyn Cassedy

Full Results

Cover Photo: California Dreamin’ – 7 competitors from all over the state – and 1 from New York – took to the water off Belmont Memorial Pier today to race the third of three regattas known as the California Dreamin’ series, a World Match Racing Grade 3 event.
Photo by Demain Photograph

Newport Harbor Yacht Club Wins the 2019 Lipton Cup

By Casey Allocco, SDYC Communications Coordinator | October 28, 2019

RESULTS

The coveted Sir Thomas Lipton Challenge Cup trophy is leaving San Diego Yacht Club and heading north to the home of this year’s winners: Newport Harbor Yacht Club! After three days of intense, close racing, skipper Justin Law and his seasoned crew earned their bragging rights by winning four of eleven races and staying in the top half of the fleet for almost every other race this weekend.

“It was super stressful. We just really played ball that last race. We had to stay five boats within Chicago and the team just did enough. Winning the first race made the tension go away and it was a great way to start the day. It set us up for a successful final two races,” commented Law.

The overall results of the 2019 Lipton Cup show Newport Harbor Yacht Club finishing first overall with 40 points. Close behind is Chicago Yacht Club in second with 43 points and San Diego Yacht Club in third with 47 points.

READ MORE…………………….

SCSN Special Report: Julia Jaynes Interview

October 22, 2019 – Long Beach, CA via Seattle, WA

Long Beach native Julia Jaynes just recently competed in the 2019 LEMWOD (Linda Elias Memorial Women’s One Design Challenge) as part of the Hawaii Yacht Club Team led by skipper Annie Gardner. The event was held over the weekend of October 12-13, 2019 in Catalina 37s and Cal 20s at Long Beach Yacht Club. Julia recently graduated from CSULB as a President’s Scholar with numerous awards and accolades. She was a member of the CSULB Sailing Team and grew up learning to sail at Leeway and ABYC. At her young age she has already given back to the sport of sailing by working as an instructor at Leeway Sailing Center and participating as a member of the race committee in last year’s 29er Worlds in Long Beach as well as an umpire at the US Sailing Match Racing Qualifiers. She has also supplied content (articles and pictures) for SCSN over her college years. Julia recently moved to Seattle where she started a career at Microsoft. Your SCSN Editor asked Julia for an interview about her experience at this event and she accepted.

Julia steering in the 37 after a long day of racing

Hi Julia, thanks for taking the time to sit down and talk sailing! Hope all is well. How are things going for you starting a new career and moving to a new city? A lot of changes for you!

It’s been really exciting to move to a new city and start work with a really great company. Seattle is definitely a lot colder and wetter than Southern California, but I love it so far.

What got you interested in sailing? From what I know, I think you pursued it on your own initiative. Is that right?

I was at Alamitos Bay on a summer day and saw other kids sailing sabots. I went home and told my parents that it looked so cool, and I wanted to learn. My parents signed me up for lessons at the Leeway Sailing Center, and I was hooked. I am really grateful that Long Beach has such a great sailing community that I got to be a part of. I did summer racing programs at ABYC and high school sailing with Long Beach Poly which were really great in setting a strong sailing foundation.

It looks like the LEMWOD was another successful event where new friendships were made and old friendships cemented and strengthened. How special is that, that our sport of sailing really brings people together!

Yes, I totally agree with that. I was really fortunate to be sailing on the same boat with my friend and fellow CSULB Sailing Team alumna, Sunny Scarbrough. And we also got to make a lot of great connections with the women on our boat and on the other teams. While the team I was on, Hawaii Yacht Club, had our eyes set out on first, it was really awesome to see my former coach, Allie Blecher win the event. I’ve made a lot of great friendships through sailing and now have friends all over the world because of the sport.

What crew position did you have on the boat?

I did pit, which is my normal position on the 37s. The team I was on was really great as we got to try out different positions throughout our practices which was awesome getting a little taste of everything. I believe it helped us to get the boat more in sync through us understanding all the roles.

How was the team assembled?

Allie Tsai organized our team. It was mostly through word of mouth but also through showing interest in women’s sailing. I was really lucky that two of my good friends race at Wet Wednesdays on Allie’s boat. I told them I wanted to get more involved with keelboat racing and eventually sail in a LEMWOD so they helped to introduce me. Allie really wanted to bring together a boat to strive for the best and empower women in sailing to achieve more which resonates with me. She brought together women in sailing who are strong, quick learners, and want to better themselves and the overall team.

Packing the boat up with Denise Eldredge and Julie Mitchell

What are some of the things you learned from your experience at this event? 

I learned a lot throughout the event. The most awesome thing was realizing how great women sailors are at not only getting the job done but also creating community. I also really grew in my voice and confidence on boat. It can be intimidating when you are the youngest and probably have the least keelboat experience. I realized a strong dinghy background provides a great basis for racing and I shouldn’t be afraid to speak up. Another great thing was having so much support and coaching from a lot of great male sailors as well. It made me realize in general the men also want the women to have success out on the water. I really got to fine tune my timing in the pit for better sets and roundings. The weekend overall was really empowering and one of the most fun regattas I had sailed. It was really great to see so many women out racing on the water and got me even more excited for future regattas and possibly bringing together my own women’s team in the future.

The wealth of sailing talent at this event was really well spread across all ages – it must have been quite a valuable experience for you to sail with some of the best women sailors , especially your skipper Annie Gardner.

I am extremely fortunate to have gotten to race with Annie Gardner as well as our tactician Katie Pettibone. They have accomplished so much in their sailing careers and really helped pave the way for women sailors. It was really cool to hear how they were thinking about not only the races themselves but setting up a game plan for the overall regatta. They are both super nice, supportive women that really love the sport. They really help set the tone for our boat, that we were going to work hard and strive for the best but also realize we are doing this for the love of the sport. They really helped to keep the boat on task but also positive and fun.

Any tips and advice you have for young women who want to learn to sail and compete in this sport?

I think sailing, especially as a woman, is a lot about dedication and courage. If you want to learn to sail, there are a lot of great opportunities at local sailing center and yacht clubs. I think dinghy racing is a great place to start. It can be intimidating as sailing is still a very male dominated sport. However, if you stay dedicated and work hard, you will be rewarded with opportunities. You also have to be courageous and not be afraid to participate, learn, and get a few bumps and bruises. I also think a big part about growing and getting opportunities in sailing is by not being afraid to ask. Ask the questions about what someone is doing to get their boat going fast; ask what you can do to help; ask if that boat you’ve always wanted to sail on is having practice days that you can crew at. I also think especially as women sailors we have to advocate a little bit more. Let others know that you can and want to do a certain roles on the boat; that you want to learn and are willing to work hard.

What things in sailing are on your bucket list to do as time goes on?

I haven’t done any offshore racing yet and would really like to get into that. I would eventually want to sail a TransPac.

Is there anything you would like to add?

I’m really grateful to be a part of a sport that is something I can do for the rest of my life. Sailing has taught me so many skills, not only how to make boats go fast but also life skills that I know have served me well. I feel really fortunate.

Thanks so much Julia for taking the time for this interview. I am sure it will inspire some young women to want to get in the sport of sailing and show what opportunities are out there for them.

Team Hawaii Yacht Club: (Standing L:R) Smith, Julie Mitchell, Katie Pettibone, Denise Eldredge, Alice Tsai, Jennifer Simonsis, Sabine Suessmann, Julia Jaynes; (Sitting) Randy Smith, Sunny Scarbrough, Annie Gardner, Holly Sweet Davis, Chuck Skewes

2019 SDYC International Masters Cup

October 18 – 20, 2019 / San Diego, CA

Andy Roy Wins 2019 International Masters Regatta
By Casey Allocco, SDYC Communications Coordinator

The only international team at the 2019 International Masters Regatta (IMR) is heading back north with the win after three days of tough, competitive racing. Andy Roy and his Canadian team grabbed the lead after the first day of the regatta and wouldn’t budge for the remainder of the weekend. The win, Roy attests, is due to clean starts and even better crew work.

“It was all Andy!” the team cheered on their way back up the Bay after the win.

“We didn’t start off the day great, but we got our act together just in time and had a great third race. We knew it was time for a good start. We just had to pull it off and get off the line. We had an opportunity to get underneath out biggest competitor [Chuck Sinks] at the start line and forced them to go up high,” Roy explained.

READ MORE…………………………………..

RESULTS

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