SAN DIEGO’s Mark Reynolds ON 2019 FINALIST LIST AS Olympic Hall of Fame INDUCTEE

There are 15 finalists for the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame class of 2019, but only one San Diegian. Tabitha Lipkin caught up with a sailor on that list that has traveled the world, but holds the 92106 area code close to his heart.

San Diego native nominated for Olympic Hall of Fame

There are 15 finalists for the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame class of 2019, but only one San Diegian. Tabitha Lipkin caught up with a sailor on that list that has traveled the world, but holds the 92106 area code close to his heart.

Posted by Tabitha Lipkin on Wednesday, August 21, 2019

List of Olympic Finalists and Bios

Mark Reynolds

OLYMPIC GAMES
1988 – Sailing
Silver: Star
1992 – Sailing
Gold: Star
1996 – Sailing
8th: Star
2000 – Sailing
Gold: Star

TOP 5 ATHLETIC ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  1. After winning the gold in 2000, Reynolds was named World Sailing’s and U.S. Sailing’s Yachtsman of the Year. These awards are considered the highest honor in the sport of sailing globally and in the United States, respectively.
  2. Won a gold medal at the 1979 Pan American Games.
  3. Reynolds was a two-time world champion in 2000 and 1995. He has eight world championship medals in the Star class.
  4. Reynolds is a 10-time continental champion.
  5. In 1989 and 1992, he was named Athlete of the Year for Sailing by the USOC.

TOP 3 REASONS FOR CONSIDERATION

  1. Reynolds is the most decorated Olympic sailors in U.S. history. In three of the four Games he attended, he earned a medal (two gold, one silver). In 1996 (Reynold’s worst Games performance) he still placed in the top 10.
  2. Off the water, Reynolds is extremely motivated and an incredible team player. While he was training for the Olympics, he simultaneously worked as a sailmaker. He not only designed the sails for all three of his medal-winning boats, but also those for his competitors.
  3. Reynolds’ dedication to fostering U.S. Olympic sailing transcends dedication to his own campaigns. In 2008, 2012 and 2016, Reynolds served as a coach for the U.S. Olympic Sailing Team. In 2016, even after the Star class was eliminated from the Olympic Games, Reynolds shared his expertise by coaching the U.S. Men’s Laser sailor, Charlie Buckingham. With guidance from Reynolds, Buckingham finished his first Olympic Games’ in the boat widely renowned as the most competitive Olympic class in 11th place.
Image: “Hal and Mark” – Painting by Jim Dewitt

BACKGROUND
• Competed in Star at four Olympic Games (1988-2000), three of them alongside Hal Haenel (1988-96).
• Four-time Olympian and three-time medalist, including two golds.
• Won six world championship medals in Star, including golds in 1995 and 2000.
• He also won a Star gold medal at the 1986 Goodwill Games, and a silver medal in the Snipe class at the 1979 Pan American Games.
• He learned to sail from his father, James Reynolds, who was a 1971 world champion in Star, as crew for Dennis Conner.
• Attended San Diego State University, graduating in 1979.
• Was named the 2000 ISAF/Sperry World Sailor of the Year, and in 2002, he was inducted into the World Sailing Hall of Fame.

KEY TAKEAWAY
Mark Reynolds represents the qualities of a model Olympian. He is an avid supporter of U.S. Sailing and Olympic excellence, an extremely talented athlete, and is dedicated to fostering the next generation of champions. During Reynold’s tenure dominating the Star class, he displayed a vast depth of skill and sportsmanship.

Long Beach’s Jay Golison takes Day One lead at the Viper 640 Worlds

Long Beach, CA – August 20, 2019

Local Skipper Jay Golison, along with Steve Flam and Eric Doyle had a good day day today to take a 4 point lead after three races.

Results After 3 Races

Long Beach’s Allie BLECHER WINS FIRST U.S. WOMEN’S MATCH RACING CHAMPIONSHIP

L to R: Ali Blumenthal, Krysia Pohl, Beka Schiff, Allie Blecher. Photo by Element Photography.

DETROIT, Mich. (August 18, 2019) — Allie Blecher (Long Beach, Calif.) won the 17th U.S. Women’s Match Racing Championship with a 2-0 victory over Giselle Camet Nyenhuis (San Diego, Calif.) in Sunday’s Final.

Blecher, the 2010 Quantum Collegiate Female Sailor of the Year and a member of the US Sailing Team in 2013, won the Allegra Knapp Mertz Trophy for the first time in her second attempt. She finished runner-up in last year’s championship held in San Francisco. This year she won an abbreviated final that was reduced to a best-of-three from a best-of-five due to thunderstorms in the Detroit area.

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Durant Wins US Sailing Match Racing Qualifier

Long Beach, Calif., August 11, 2019 – Dustin Durant continued his winning streak today and locked in his place at the US Match Racing Championship Finals at St. Francis Yacht Club in San Francisco this October 3 through October 6.

After a 3-year hiatus from match racing, Durant and crew have officially got their groove back. After the 8 and 0 record yesterday, Durant said that he was a little nervous at the start, but following a practice race and logging their first win, it felt that he and his five crewmembers got back in the groove. “The teamwork was there,” the LBYC sailor said.

Trent Turigliatto, LBYC on the right, starts against Nesbitt in the 9th flight

Given that Durant is a four-time Congressional Cup Skipper and a two-time California Dreamin’ Series winner, and following yesterday’s sweep, the top-placed finish today was not a surprise. But with two races scheduled for today, anything could have happened.

The 31-year-old skipper shared the win with Shane Young on main, Neil Rietdyk and Wes Bryne on trim, Jack Bazz in the pit and Ian Paice upfront on the bow.

San Diego Yacht Club’s Chris Nesbitt will be one of the skippers Durant will face in October. Nesbitt also had a second strong day. Currently ranked 29th in the world and 5th in the US, Nesbitt competed here earlier this year in both the Butler Cup and Ficker Cup and has already qualified for the US Match Racing Championship. He won his first match today against Trent Turigliatto who arrived for today’s races with a sprained ankle and (adding insult to injury), incurred a penalty at the start.

Nesbitt’s second loss of the series came in the second race, and for a second time to Durant.

The second skipper qualified for the Championships is Cameron Feves, who won a qualifier in Chicago earlier this year and is the reigning Rose Cup winner. Feves didn’t have a strong showing Saturday, but he and his crew started to get to a better feel for the complexities of the Catalina 37s by the end of racing yesterday and put up a strong fight today in an attempt to break the three-way tie for third.

The day’s first flight saw all three seasoned skippers, Nesbitt, Liz Hjorth and Durant facing off against their younger rivals and schooled them handily. With the win in that flight, Hjorth, sailing for California Yacht Club, secured third place. Momentarily.

In the second flight, Feves turned up the heat, winning the race and drawing her back into the fold.

Chris Nesbitt, SDYC, and crew place second

When LBYC’s sailing coach, Trent Turigliatto beat Colton Gerber in the last race, both young rivals had scored a win against Hjorth, which resulted in how the third-place position finishers ranked.

Colton Gerber, a 23-year old Corpus Christi, Texas resident sailing for Ann Arbor Yacht Club finished in last place but will go home with a boatload of experience. A lengthy collegiate sailing resume garnered an invitation to this event. But the Catalina 37s, the largest boat he and the crew have sailed, challenged the team.

“Boat handling deficiencies caught up to us pretty quick,” Gerber said. “Trial by fire, it’s how it works in sailing.” He felt good about the progress he and the crew made by the end of the day and looked to improve boat speed day. The trip to California was also an alumni reunion of sorts as his entire crew is fellow University of Michigan alumni, with one crewmember in his senior year.

Even Parker Mitchell, who handles the main for Nesbitt, said the boats really put boat skills to the test. “It’s hard to win races without strong boat handling skills,” he said.

This race was also the first time Feves had sailed the Catalina 37. Along with the bigger boat, he picked up a few crew members with varying degree of experience. The 18-year-old, sailing for Cabrillo Beach Yacht Club, said they learned as they went; catching a couple of flags that didn’t go their way, but overall, were pleased with the progress made in just 10 races.

The USMRC Finals in San Francisco will be sailed in J/22s, boats that both Nesbitt and Feves have experience with. “We want to win that one,” Feves said.

This qualifier event was sailed in Long Beach Sailing Foundation’s fleet of identical Catalina 37 sailboats donated by Frank Butler, the president of Catalina Yachts, for use in Long Beach Yacht Club’s signature event, the Congressional Cup. They are used in many events throughout the year that test many a skipper’s sailing skills and the further development of those skills.

Although this was also Turigliatto’s debut as skipper on the Catalina 37, the young racer has frequently sailed as crew on the boats for other skippers. And as Durant’s win today affirms, experience, teamwork, and local knowledge is a recipe for success.

Racing started before noon today, on a course off the Belmont Veterans Memorial Pier. Winds of 9 – 10 knots filled in early creating elevated sailing conditions typical of late afternoons.

Content and Photos by Laurie Morrison for LBYC

SOCAL Sailors Gibbs/Weiss Clinch Gold in Pan Am Games – Charlie Buckingham Scores a Bronze

Racing has concluded in six of the seven 2020 Olympic class sailing events at the Pan American Games Lima 2019. Team USA had representatives in all six Medal Races and delivered Medals in four of the five that were sailed. Riley Gibbs (Long Beach, Calif.) and Anna Weis (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) clinched a Gold Medal in the Nacra 17 fleet. Charlotte Rose (Houston, Texas) and Pedro Pascual (West Palm Beach, Fla.) earned Silver Medals in the Laser Radial and RS:X fleets, respectively. Charlie Buckingham (Newport Beach, Calif.) won the Bronze in the Laser fleet.

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2019 TransPac 50 Hightlight Video

Grab your Mai Tai🍹, sit back, and enjoy the culmination of all the hard work by the sailors, sponsors, volunteers, staff, and the local support that made 50th edition of the LA – Honolulu Transpacific Yacht Race such a success.

🎥 by Chris Love Productions

Aloha Spirit at the Final Awards of Transpac 50

HONOLULU, HAWAII – “Aaaalloooh-haaah!” This greeting repeated in unison by the crowd of over 600 attendees is how Transpacific Yacht Club Commodore Tom Hogan commenced the Awards Ceremony to the 50th edition of the LA – Honolulu Transpacific Yacht Race on Friday night. For the next two hours this audience was entertained by local Hawaiian dancers, photo and video images of the race, a few stories to provide context, and an awards ceremony emceed by Chuck Hawley where dozens of beautiful and historic trophies were presented to winners in numerous categories of multihull and monohull divisions in the race.

Hula dancers started the celebration – photo David Livingston

With 10 divisions of monohulls and 2 divisions of multihulls, and awards given to the winners, runners-up and in the larger classes third-place finishers as well, there were lots of leis and trophies distributed in this ceremony. Here is a summary of each:

The crew of the Eddy family’s Cal 40 Callisto accepting their awards in Division 10 – Walt Cooper/Ultimate Sailing

The Cal 40’s are an important part of Transpac history, and this year had an impressive turnout of 6 boats. Unfortunately one had to turn back, so they missed the fight into the finish between the top three. The Eddy family’s Callisto emerged from that fight on top, while Rodney Pimentel’s Azure and Don Jesberg’s Viva margin for second and third, respectively, was only 2 1/2 minutes in corrected time after 12 days of racing.

Division 9 was one of the smallest with four boats, but had a great diversity of boat types. Ian Ferguson’s Wasa 55 Nadelos finished only 3 minutes ahead of Christian Doegl’s Swan 461 Free, but in corrected time managed to win the class by over 13 hours.

Division 8 was another small and diverse class of boats, made smaller by two retirements early in the race due to rudder issues. Nonetheless Dean Treadway’s Farr 36 Sweet Okole came out on top but not by much: by just under 8 minutes in corrected time.

Chubasco in celebration – photo Walt Cooper/Ultimate Sailing

Like Divisions 8 and 9, Division 7 was also a very diverse class of entries that was also reduced by two retirements due to rudder problems. Chubasco campaigned by Tom Akin, John Carpenter, Doug Baker and Will Durant has a long history in Transpac, having been built in 1937, and went through an extensive refit of 2 1/2 years to be the winning team this year. A moment of silence was observed in the awards ceremony for crew member Jim Lincoln who passed after the conclusion of the race.

Division 6 had 11 boats an only one retirement, with another (David Chase and Carlos Brea’s Fast 42 Uhambro) that broke their mast but finished the race under jury rig. This was the fastest of the five classes starting in the first wave of the race, and aside from having to dive south for a little while, the wind never stopped for them. Winner of this division was Scott Grealish’s J/121 BlueFlash from Oregon with not only an all-amateur team to qualify for the Corinthian Division, but also two father/son pairs on their team of six.

The crew of overall winners on Hamachi posing with the new King Kalakaua Trophy with trophy artist Ka’ili Chun (right) – photo Sharon Green/Ultimate Sailing

Division 5 was the smallest class in the race with only three boats because of the second wave of starters they were not a good fit with the other racier boats in the other classes. Tom Barker’s Swan 60 Good Call finished an entire day ahead of his class rivals, and corrected time compressed that margin to just a couple hours.

Division 4 was a group of 11 boats often called the Fabulous Fifties being composed of all Santa Cruz-designed and built 50’s and 52’s. With many of these having years and years of experience, this is often a highly-competitive class, and this year was no exception: Michael Moradzadeh’s Santa Cruz 50 Oaxaca won by a margin of less than 12 minutes.

With no roadblocks on the race course and the opportunity for little deviations due to the position of the High, many predicted the overall winner of the race would come from Division 3’s 13 boats, and it did. Congratulations to Shawn Dougherty, Jason Andrews and their team on their J/125 Hamachi for their outstanding performance.

Crew of Taxi Dancer, winners of Division 2 – photo David Livingston

For many years Division 2 was the class that had all the first-to-finish boats in Transpac. With a strong turnout of 9 entries this class was also going to be closely watched due to all the collective years of Transpac experience and having some of the best teams on the course. Regrettably two of the class members dropped out, but the competition remained keen among those who went on the Hawaii, with Jim Yabsley and Mary Compton’s team on their R/P 70 Taxi Dancer winning by a close margin of less than 3 minutes in corrected time.

Division 1 was the largest class on the race course with 15 boats of the fastest types of monohulls, and ranged widely from 40 to 100 feet in length. From this class is where the Barn Door and Merlin Trophies reside for fastest elapsed time performance, but in corrected time this year’s winner is Tom Holthus’s Pac 52 Bad Pak.

James Cooney receiving the Don Vaughn Award for most valuable crew member on the Barn Door-winning yacht – photo David Livingston

Had it not been for the hiccup the first night the Saturday starters tried to get off the coast, Multihull Division 0 could have had a real high-speed chess game all the way to Hawaii. But it was Jason Carroll’s MOD 70 Argo that just got their nose into the pressure first and sped away from all others to win this class.

Blog followers enjoyed getting the daily stories of what food was being served on Lior Elazary’s Lagoon 400S2 Celestra, so even though they were the entry with the longest elapsed time of 13 days 20 hours, TPYC congratulates them for winning Multihull Class 0A and also one of our sponsors, The Moorings, for the business they will receive now that everyone knows how comfortable it is sailing these boats offshore.

In addition to these performance prizes, numerous special awards were given for deeded perpetual trophies not only in categories such as First Monohull to Finish (the Barn Door Trophy, won this year by Jim Cooney and Samantha Grant’s VPLP 100 Comanche), or the Rudi Choi Award for the First to Finish Multihull (won by Argo), but also special Navigator Awards to the navigators on each division-winning entry, the Don Clothier Award for the fastest cruiser under 50 feet (Michael Lawler’s North Wind 47 Traveler) and the Tail End Charlie award to the last finisher on the course (won by Jason Seibert’s Schock 40 Gamble).

Paul Kamen winning the Rudi Award – photo David Livingston

Some of these special awards are in remembrance to individuals who have helped make Transpac the legendary race it has become and are therefore recognised as an important part of the heritage of this event. One is the Mark S. Rudiger Award (aka the Rudi Trophy) dedicated to world-class navigator Mark Rudiger who not won this race many times but other prominent ocean races around the world. The perpetual trophy is a special brass sextant built in 1905 donated by another famous navigator, Stan Honey. The criteria for winning this award is for demonstrated skills in celestial and traditional navigation, and this year it was presented by another well-accomplished navigator, John Jourdane, to Paul Kamen, better known by his nom de plume Max Ebb in the Bay Area’s popular sailing monthly Latitude 38.

Dallas Kilponen from Kialoa II receiving the Burla Trophy with Michele Burla Parker and Pam Burla – photo Sharon Green/Ultimate Sailing

Another was the new Ronald L. Burla Trophy for Media Excellence in memory of a Transpac sailor from the 1930’s who went on to be a founding member of the Waikiki YC and tireless promoter of the race as Publicity Director of the Hawaii Visitor’s Bureau in the 1950’s and ’60’s. Burla’s daughters Michele Burla Parker and Pam Burla presented this new trophy to Dallas Kilponen sailing on Patrick Broughton’s 1964-built S&S 73 ketch Kialoa II, for his outstanding video shot, edited and submitted during the race. The jury noted Kilponen’s outstanding ability to capture the history, joy and aloha spirit inherent to racing in the Transpac.

This video is uploaded to YouTube at this link:

The Nash Family Corinthian Award was given to Thomas Garnier’s crew on this J/125 Reinrag2 for the best performance in the fleet for an all-amateur team…they finished 5th in Division 3 and 5th overall.

Yet another new trophy was established by the Storm Trysail Club this year to be awarded to the 3-boat team which compiles the best score, as determined by using the total of each team member’s percentage placement in its respective class. Eleven teams entered this competition, which was won by Naughty Blue Tequila team comprised of Nadelos (“naughty”), Azure (“blue”) and Oaxaca (“tequila”). So with a first in class by Oaxaca and Nadelos, and a 3rd in class by Azure, this team secured the trophy for 2019.

Roy Disney (left) and his crew from Pyewacket receiving the Arthur B. Hanson Award – photo Sharon Green/Ultimate Sailing

Finally, a prize not planned in the program but appropriately presented at the ceremony was US Sailing’s Arthur B. Hanson Rescue Medal awarded to Roy Disney and the crew of his Andrews 68 Pyewacket for their outstanding efforts in the rescue of John Sangmeister and his crew of the Santa Cruz 70 OEX. The rudder damage, fast sinking and subsequent safe and timely rescue of the OEX team made headlines around the world for the Pyewacket team’s exemplary seamanship and sportsmanship to come quickly to the aid of a competitor in trouble at sea.

Having an auditorium full of peers who profoundly understand and appreciate the risk of offshore sailing, this dramatic story retold in detail by Sangmeister elicited tremendous emotion throughout the audience, and when Disney took the stage the entire room rose in ovation to salute him and his crew, who were subsequently joined by the crew of OEX as well.

The honor conveyed both in the Hanson award and that bestowed by the salute of the auditorium filled with the sailors, families, friends, organizers and sponsors of Transpac 50 will be remembered as one of the great moments in Transpac history. Disney has already been nominated for Seahorse Sailor of the Month…vote for him here at this link: https://seahorsemagazine.com/sailor-of-the-month/vote-for-sailor-of-the-month.

For more information on Transpac 50 and its history, events and sponsors, visit the main website at https://2019.transpacyc.com.

Aloha!

Cover Photo: Crew of Comanche with the First Monohull to Finish Barn Door trophy – Photo Walt Cooper/Ultimate Sailing

Godspeed Jim Lincoln – The Chubasco team and crew are saddened by the passing of Boat Manager Jim Lincoln.

He passed away in his sleep on July 24th, 4 days after finishing the 2019 TransPac race. He was a fixture in the Long Beach sailing community, a member of Alamitos Bay Yacht Club and will be truly missed.

Cover Photo: Steve Jost Photography

Local Sailing News From SoCal and Beyond